08 December 2016

an interesting concept

this just seems awkward for everybody...
happy immaculate conception day!

in argentina, austria, chile, colombia, italy, malta, portugal and spain, as well as in many parts of switzerland, today is a holiday dedicated to the celebration of the virgin mary and her place in christian mythology. as you can tell from the places where this day is celebrated, mary is a much bigger deal for catholics, who are a lot more polytheistic than you would think, than for protestants.

you could also be forgiven for thinking that december 8th is a weird day to be celebrating the immaculate conception, since the end product of the immaculate conception is supposed to have been born less than three weeks later, on the 25th. either the baby jesus really didn't want to come out, or grew at a rate only seen in that thing from spawn.

but it turns out that this is the celebration of mary's conception to her mother, saint anne, and father joachim, a previously barren couple who were told by an angel that, when they did give birth to a child, she would change the whole world. moved by the experience, anne offered her newborn daughter to god's service. you probably don't want to think too hard about how that could have been interpreted.

[side note :: if she were conceived on the 8th of december, that means that mary would have been born in early to mid-september of the following year. astrologically speaking, that would make her a virgo.]

anne and joachim don't actually appear in the bible, which explains why the purist protestants don't pay them any mind. they are mentioned in a few early christian texts which catholics, like jews and muslims about their holy books, consider important to the overall understanding of the bible. there isn't a lot of history about jesus' maternal grandparents, but it does establish that there was a tradition in the family of angelically delivered pregnancy test results, which might explain why mary's whole "god made me pregnant" didn't seem so weird.

the holiday wasn't celebrated by christians until about the eighth century, which is just as well for poor mary, who probably wouldn't have enjoyed it. after all mary wasn't conceived immaculately, so every year she would have been forced to watch a growing number of people celebrate her parents getting it on.

the 'immaculate' in this sense refers to a unique gift bestowed on mary by god, and one that proved controversial: mary is the only human being since adam and eve to be born absolved of original sin. if you're a devout catholic, that's a huge thing. original sin taints every single human. we have a ritual wherein we wash away the sin through baptism and literally every person who was never baptised, including all the good people who lived before anyone knew they were supposed to be baptised, goes to hell. the claim was controversial enough that the heads of the catholic church were arguing until 1854 about whether or not it was going too far to say that it was true. [eventually, pope pius ix, a big mary fan and the only verified person to hold the office longer than john paul ii, said that he believed it, which seems like a rather anticlimactic way to end a thousand-year debate, but that's the catholic church for you.]

i personally like knowing about these so-called 'days of obligation' [you're supposed to go to church], because it reminds me of how very odd our dominant religions have been throughout their history. so i take a moment to think upon mary who, if you believe the theologists, is sitting with her parents in heaven, watching a whole lot of people honour "hail mary your parents boned today" day.

p.s. :: mary might have just chosen to distract herself from the details of how she was conceived by ducking out to a party for the prophet muhammed. his birthday- december is a big month for religious leaders, apparently- is also celebrated today, but only in kuwait. everywhere else in the islamic world celebrates it on the 11th/ 12th depending on the lunar calendar, meaning that, this year at least, he gets a whole long weekend of birthday. lucky boy.

p.p.s. :: in the byzantine church, joachim and anne get their own day on the 25th of july, which has nothing to do with them getting busy. 

04 December 2016

making faces :: becca makes me blush

dom is extremely understanding about my makeup addiction interest. he not only knows that a colourful treat can pick me up when i'm feeling ground down, but he even appreciates different colours, textures and looks and is great at making suggestions. i'm a lucky lady. where he draws the line, though, is with blush. by his own admission, he can't ever tell one from the other and i imagine that's true for many people: unless it's applied really heavily, it's always just a few tones from your natural skin colour, and if it is applied really heavily, chances are you look crazy.

but i can always tell when i get blushes and highlighters just right. i'll catch a glimpse of myself in the mirror and there will be a difference that's visible even if the view is fleeting; i find i'll look healthy or, and i've never quite figured out why this should be the case, happy. having a perfectly complementary colour seems to bring a positive energy to my face. but not just one complementary colour, of course. the fun is in finding different ways to achieve different effects.

and since i'd already had my interest piqued by becca with their highlighter palette last year, i was excited when they launched both a new blush line and a series of duos [as part of their collaboration with makeup artist jaclyn hill] that featured both a blush [in their previously existing, matte mineral formula] plus one of the two highlighters developed for the hill line.

i snoozed and lost with the large blush and highlighter jaclyn hill palette earlier this year, but since i already had one of the highlighters, 'champagne pop' from last year's palette, and not all of the blushes looked like a good match for my colouring, it was actually a bit of a relief when the blush i most wanted and the second highlighter were made available as a duo only. less money, and i get just what i want.

the duo in question is 'pamplemousse' mineral blush and 'prosecco pop' highlighter. 'pamplemousse' is french for grapefruit, and, indeed, the shade does look like a very bright red pink, much like the inside of the fruit when it's been sliced in half. it's a lot less like the colour of pink grapefruit juice, or sliced grapefruit, which is lighter and softer. this is a bold colour, although it fortunately can be applied lightly and diffused to keep the effect from looking too dramatic on light skin.

pamplemousse

i was a little surprised that this shade wasn't closer to others in my collection, because, when i first laid eyes on it, i thought it would be. mac 'salsarose' is pinker and deeper. armani '509' is considerably deeper and looks almost magenta by comparison, which shows that 'pamplemousse' has more warmth in it than is immediately apparent. for colour analysis purposes, it's a shade that will flatter both bright seasons- winter and spring- immensely, having a lot of pigment and a warm-under-cool kind of tone that can be hard to find. it's also available as a single shade, which may be important to you, as i'll explain shortly.

l to r :: mac salsarose, pamplemousse, blush d'armani 509

the texture of the blush felt a little stiff and it wasn't the easiest to blend out, but it also didn't just blend away. given the two options, i'd rather blend more and apply less. on the skin, the finish is beautiful. it's very smooth, doesn't emphasize pores and it gives an especially healthy glow if you buff it with a soft brush. it is a mostly matte finish, but buffing gives it some sheen, if that's your preference. i'd say the wear time was about average on me, which for a mineral blush is not great, but it's one of the better mineral formulas i've tried for longevity.

'prosecco pop' like all of becca's shimmering skin perfector highlighters, is for those whose highlighting tastes are more vegas than paris. their luminous skin perfectors are very consistent, with a shine that's nearly metallic. you will glow like a spotlight, even with a relatively light application, which, combined with the fact that the high-shine finish can emphasize pores, makes them most appropriate to nighttime wear.

the colour looks like a bright, clear, yellowy gold in the pan and you'd better believe that's how it looks on skin. there's a warmer, slightly orange undertone i could see, which i think is the effect of the gold layered over the pink tones in my cheeks. this is absolutely a warm-toned product, best suited, i think, to warm spring complexions, although probably some autumn ones as well. [the strong yellow tones could make it look a little too hard on an autumn face.]

prosecco pop

i don't have a highlighter that looks much like this at all. both hourglass 'luminous light' and becca's own 'champagne pop' look quite peachy by comparison, and those are the most yellow-toned highlighters i own.

l to r :: hourglass luminous light, prosecco pop, becca champagne pop

the highlighter, lovely though it is, is too warm for my skin, so i have to be careful how much i apply and wear. yes, i can make it work, because getting some effect takes very little product, and layering it over something cooler creates a balance, but it's not the easiest match with my skin.

if it is a great match for yours, and if you like the metal gleam that becca offers, this is a really nice and original highlight. most gold tones are either whitened, which makes them much cooler, or browned, which makes them more muted. this is warm and saturated. the blush has enough warmth that it could work with the typical true spring complexion, i think, especially when it's layered with the highlight. bright spring would be the next best match.

next up, we have 'camelia', which is one of the new shimmering skin perfector blushes that were launched in the early summer. these are meant to combine the colour of a regular blush with the shimmery finish of their highlighters. i chose 'camelia' because i was shocked to discover that i was remarkably short on plain pink blushes, ones that didn't pull too lavender or peach, not too light or dark, and i had nothing in the entire family that was even a little shimmery. clearly, we were meant to be.

the coverage on this is described as "buildable", which is usually code for "starts off kind of light and sheer". i cannot imagine what complexion would need to build up this colour. unless your face is an astrological anomaly that absorbs colour and light, multiple passes are not going to be necessary. which is to say that the formula is very pigmented. it's described as a "ballerina pink", which is a reasonably accurate description of the base colour [i remember my ballet slippers being somewhat lighter, but it's been a very long time]. but what really steals the show here is the infusion of smooth, light gold shimmer. the effect isn't quite as high-wattage as the plain highlighters, but it is pretty dazzling. it's more of a combination blush and highlighter than one or the other.

camelia [one swipe]

as i mentioned, i don't have a lot of blushes in this range, but here's a comparison with the closest one i could find, mac mineralize blush in 'dainty'. as you can see, 'camelia' is deeper, pinker and cooler.

l to r :: camelia, mac dainty

the downside of this is that the colour can emphasise pores, and the more you blend, the more emphasis you're going to get. my advice is to take a very fluffy brush [i like the mac 188] and tap it in place, then diffuse around the edges. of course, if you want to amp up the highlighter effect, blend away!

although it's not quite what was promised, i have no problem with the full-colour application, particularly since the formula is so soft and blendable. the colour really is a gorgeous pink that will suit a lot of complexions. any kind of spring mix, from bright winter to light summer is likely to find this fits right in, and will just need to get the level of colour they want.

here's a look at these beauties in action [and a sneak preview of some other products i'll be reviewing in the near future], starting with the combination of 'prosecco pop' and 'pamplemousse'. this is what the two of them look like layered- blush on bottom, highlighter on top, although if you want to reduce the effect on your pores, you could do it the other way around.

this is a pretty bright application, which i thought suited the summery colours of the rest of my makeup. [i've been sitting on this review for rather a long time.]




the eye makeup is a combination of brands and shades, including shiseido 'fire opal', a gorgeous bright orange that's sadly discontinued, and mac 'natural wilderness'. the lip gloss is anastasia 'date night', a bold red-pink with a bit of translucency. the overall look i was going for here was saturated colour, but with a sheen that meant nothing looked flat. it's all supposed to catch the light.

next up, we have a softer, moodier look with 'camelia'. as i said, there's no need for a highlighter with this one, although i am wearing guerlain pressed meteorites as a finishing powder, which tamps down the shimmer just a teensy bit. i think that this shows how camelia can be a natural-looking shade, but still give a healthy dose of colour.




the eye makeup here is made up of mainly one colour: armani's matte eye tint in 'fur smoke', which is the closest i'll get to wearing fur. the lipstick is nars' 'apoline', a recent addition to their audacious collection.

tl;dr i really like both products, but would recommend a light hand to avoid too much colour. both 'prosecco pop' and 'camelia' can do unkind things to large pores, especially when buffed onto the skin. if you're looking for a colour that suits your complexion, these will work best on someone whose complexion has at least some warmth and can handle pretty saturated, clear shades that are neither very light nor very dark.

i keep telling myself that i'll have to eventually try something other than a cheek product from becca, but they're really not making that easy for me.

01 December 2016

sounds good

listening to different languages as often as i do these days, i've noticed that i'm developing certain favourites, simply in terms of the way that they sound. it may seem strange, but i find it relaxing to just listen to someone speak a few lines in a language- any language, even one i don't understand. the catholic church has been aware of the power of a remote language for centuries, sticking to latin long after their faithful had adopted other tongues. it is very much like hearing someone cast a magic spell over you, which, in the case of religion, is pretty much what it is.

these things are, of course, totally subjective, but as it happens there is an annual language world cup, where participants get to vote on their favourite, match by match, over ten weeks, among 64 of the most popular languages in the world. 2016 saw the fifth annual competition and, for the second time, polish came out as the grand victor, edging out italian, while german claimed third prize against spanish. and yes, polish coming out on top is just about as shocking as it would be if poland won the actual world cup, because, if you go with the theory that having a large number of native speakers gives you a leg up, polish started the tournament at a massive disadvantage compared to languages like mandarin, english and spanish.

of course, the top tens, a website dedicated to creating dynamic lists of all sorts through popular voting, has french rated as #1. [french was the 2015 winner of the language world cup, too.] in fact, romance languages occupy every one of the top four positions, while polish doesn't even crack the top twenty [although two other slavic languages, russian and ukrainian, are in the top ten]. that's not entirely surprising, because romance languages have long been praised for their flowing, musical sound. lord byron said that italian sounded "as if it should be writ on satin", a phrase which, ironically, sounds like verbal sex when actually said in italian: "come se dovrebbe essere scritto su raso."

the magic of italian is that its words almost always end in vowels, which means that whatever you're saying is rushing towards the ultimate destination of a sensuously opened mouth, the sound fading from the lips rather than coming to a crashing halt against your teeth or getting shot like an arrow from the tongue. while not all romance languages share this trait, to the ears of someone used to communicating in a west germanic tongue that crackles like crusty bread, they all sound softer and more buttery.

although i'm hardly equipped to offer a comprehensive list- there are seven thousand languages in the world and i have only two ears in which to put them- i thought i'd share some of my favourites with you, my own personal "loveliest and most luscious languages".

xhosa

i don't know nearly enough about african languages to pick favourites, but it is impossible not to love a language that incorporates a variety of clicking sounds. [really, though, the question should be why the rest of us don't.] but the end result is that the language basically comes with its own rhythm section.



polish

what can i say? i think the language world cup might have gotten it right. although those consonant clusters look like someone got their face stuck in a typewriter and like it would sound much the same, polish is a language of incredible lightness and delicacy. the key to getting it right is to just let it flutter out of you. a friend of mine described it as being whispery, which it is thanks to the frequent use of affricates [those sounds you make by pushing them through your teeth]. so it combines the elegance of french [including all those vowel sounds we westerners struggle to reproduce] with a mystery all its own.



greek

if you like the softness of the romance languages, you're going to love greek. they don't even bother with bumpy sounds like 'b', 'd' and the hard 'g', and make great use of 'th' [voiced and unvoiced]. there is definitely an element of serpentine temptation that coils its way through everything in this language.



mongolian

i don't even know how to describe this. it's tempting to think that it's a combination of asian and russian/ slavic, but the fact is that it predates any russian presence in the area. i personally think this jewel of a language was a gift from aliens who came to the siberian wilds centuries ago.



icelandic

this language is a sort of living antique, being closer to the old norse of epic poetry than to its near nordic cousins norwegian, swedish and danish. [it's also apparently fiendishly difficult to learn compared to those languages.] and indeed, it does sound rather like poetry. well, maybe not at this one infamous moment... but normally.



vietnamese

i feel like this is what language would sound like if you fused a human being with a glockenspiel. there's a crisp, bell-like sound to every phoneme and phrase, so that it has that shivery effect like when someone runs their fingers very softly over your skin.



lithuanian

being the closest thing to the original indo-european language, it's fitting that it sounds like everything and like nothing else. its only close relative is neighbouring latvian, but while you can spot similarities with several european tongues, it also has a number of parallels with sanskrit. i haven't yet managed to find a good online course for this beauty, but i'm determined that some day, i'm going to be able to sound like that...



so that is my list of favourites. it's admittedly european-heavy simply because those are the languages to which i've been most frequently exposed. do any of these tickle your eardrums? or are there others that hold you rapt? 

29 November 2016

mental health mondays :: social disease

the woman on the left is an introvert.
the woman in the centre is judging you.
like a lot of introverts, i enjoy public speaking. think that sounds contradictory? i can understand your confusion, because there's a tendency to assume that all introverts are shy types, lacking in confidence. but for many introverts, discomfort doesn't come from having to be around people, but from having to interact with people, and the more personal and less structured the interaction, the more uncomfortable we get. but put us in a situation where we have to do something like deliver a speech in a highly controlled environment, where the other people are at a distance and where there's no need for incidental small talk, and we're surprisingly comfortable.

that wasn't always the case, for me, though. for most of my early life, i was so petrified of public speaking that i would go to almost any length to avoid it. if i had to speak in front of a class at school, i would feel physically ill for hours beforehand. i tried the whole "confront your fears" thing by participating in school debate clubs and model parliaments, which succeeded only in making me feel like the worst public speaker in recorded history. [not that any of it was recorded. i'm thankful every day for the fact that recording and sharing technology was unknown at the time.] at that point in my life, i wasn't just an introvert, but someone with a social phobia, and a very common one.

i share those rather mundane details as a way of illustrating a point: social phobia, or social anxiety, is not the same as being introverted. social anxiety stems from a deep-seated fear of the reactions of others. in our ancient, pre-linguistic cave-dwelling past, that reaction was what warned us not to just wander up to groups of hominids we didn't know. it's still the reaction that makes us say "no, strange person in the dirty panel van, i would not like to come and see the video arcade that you've installed in your basement." but, as we've reformed our world faster than our mind can adjust, those very reasonable reactions start poking out like springs in an old mattress, and, like those springs, they can cause some pretty ungodly pain.

people with social anxiety have difficulty meeting other people, interacting with authority figures, and being the subject of attention [especially if the attention seems belittling, like someone teasing them or criticizing them]. introverts, despite the fact that western culture esteems extroverts, can generally find their way through the social ecosystem without too many problems. people with social anxiety can't. their fear of failure and/ or ridicule is crippling. [oh, and if you're one of those blustery types who says that you don't care what anyone thinks of you, because you just do what you want, consider that the need to assert your superiority over something may well be a defense mechanism in and of itself.]

the term "social anxiety disorder" is tossed around a lot and, like obsessive compulsive disorder, it gets pretty heavily abused. often, people refer to themselves as having social anxiety because they don't like to be in a crowd. [in all my years on this planet, i have yet to meet anyone who likes being in a crowd. the reactions generally range from barely tolerant to outright rage.] there is also the potential to equate social anxiety with shyness, which is tricky, because people who have social anxiety are shy, they're just shy on a level that goes beyond the usual "takes a while to come out of their shell" way. [side note :: the western obsession with individuality seems to put us at a far greater risk than cultures that have a more collectivist mindset. the pressure to be our own, individual person creates a bizarre side effect: the inability to be our own, individual person among others.]

while people with social anxiety can have panic attacks in situations where they might feel exposed, there's no rule that says that panic and social anxiety go together [or that panic and any kind of anxiety go together for that matter]. a person can feel troubled and emotional and uneasy without breaking into full-blown panic and that doesn't mean the problem is any less serious. [some argue that people with panic disorder don't even realise that their attacks are stress induced and believe them to be caused by a physical problem outside the brain. i don't personally agree with that hypothesis, but it's an opinion that comes from folks who are more versed than i am in the world of psychology.] so having a complete meltdown is not a prerequisite for being considered socially disordered.

so how do you tell the difference between acceptable shyness and a disorder? well, my smart-ass answer is that you don't, a doctor does. but a useful way of approaching things, if you don't yet want to involve a doctor, is to try to track situations where you feel stressed and unable to function, and to take special note of things that you may avoid doing/ feel unable to do because of that stress. being unable to bring yourself to sing karaoke might not be something that compromises your future [if you have a voice like me, it's something that might save it]. being unable to voice an opinion in a group at work, on the other hand, could keep you from being able to progress in a field that you really love. and avoiding certain activities altogether stops you from experiencing any of the enjoyment and benefits you might get from them.

a lot of the time, social anxiety triggers visible physical symptoms, like profuse sweating, stammering, flushing and trembling. and while we all get those sometimes, they shouldn't be overwhelming and they shouldn't be so obvious that other people are worried. but even if the signs are physical, if the unpleasant symptoms you associate with interacting with others are powerful enough to stop you from doing something you actually want to, or feel you need to, do, they're worth talking to someone about.

unfortunately, a number of people, professionally trained people, think that the best way to work through this is to just confront the fear head on. [do they tell that to people who have a fear of death, i wonder?] that's a pretty ugly way in which a professional can be wrong and, given that interactions with professionals or authority figures are often difficult for people with social anxiety disorder, it's something that likely prolongs a lot of people's suffering.

why? because the problem in social anxiety disorder isn't with the social interactions per se, but with the thought patterns surrounding them. encouraging people to put themselves in situations that scare them is only helpful if those fears have a solid rational base, e.g., "i am afraid of the ocean because i don't know how to swim." someone with that sort of fear might be terrified to take swimming lessons, but, through careful and controlled exposure, could learn to overcome the fear. however, if i am left flushed and shaking at the thought of being around strangers and having to talk to them, chances are i don't fear what they are actually going to do to me. i don't go to meetings in the office thinking that if they don't like my plan for the upcoming quarter, they're going to skin me alive. instead, i fear on some level that they find me ridiculous or ignorant, and that on its own, even if they have no power to do anything else to me [and even if i am not eager to impress those specific individuals], is enough to make me ill. people who have social anxiety are often well aware that their fears are not rational [as in, they know that nothing bad is really going to happen to them], but that's sort of like me saying i understand the process of nuclear fusion in theory: neither one of these things is going to have an effect on real world events. a therapist who insists that all a person needs to do is face their fears, without any other help, is not someone who should be entrusted with healing your brain. [keep in mind that, at the other end of the spectrum, there's no evidence whatsoever that medication alone helps with social anxiety in anything but the immediate short term. if all your doctor wants you to do is medicate before a potentially stressful situation, tell them to prescribe something in a single malt, since that's going to have a lot fewer additional ingredients for your system to process.]

so, no matter how uncomfortable you feel about standing your ground against someone in a position of authority, never let yourself be bullied into a course of treatment that doesn't feel right. ask questions. ask all the questions. ask for better answers from better people if you don't like the ones that you're getting. you have the right to live with manageable levels of stress in regular situations. social anxiety is a burden, but it's actually one that's very responsive to therapy [which, unlike drugs or just thrusting yourself into a situation you fear, actually will address the thought patterns that are associated with your stress]. so grab life by the horns, or the reins, or whatever part you feel would make the best sort of statement. make eye contact with people you don't know for just long enough to seem confident but not creepy. smile at someone you've just met and be comfortable in the knowledge that they aren't judging you because they couldn't care less about your existence and won't even remember your name in twenty minutes. march into work tomorrow and tell the coworker whose desk is located closest to the meeting room that you've vomited in her filing cabinet for the last time. you are wounded, but you can heal. 

22 November 2016

making faces :: flower of scotland

ah, the resilient, hardy thistle. the english can go on about their roses, but the oldest national flower that we know of is the thistle, and it represents the resilient, hardy scots who sit forever perched on england's shoulder. it's a peculiar-looking purple flower, encircled by stems with sharp thorns and invasive like a weed, and it does seem to rather sum up the condition of scottish-ness rather well.

it's also, as it turns out, the name of one of the six lipsticks launched by bite beauty this summer as the first extension of their "amuse bouche" lipstick line. given my well-established interest in genealogy and family history, as well as my obsession with lipsticks, it was always pretty much a given that i was going to buy a lipstick called "thistle" no matter what. the fact that it exists in what has become one of my very favourite formulas in the world is just a bonus.

the thistle flower itself is a surprisingly bold purple. i say "surprisingly" because scotland isn't exactly going to rival fiji for its bold natural colour palette. indeed, as comedian craig ferguson has noted, in scotland, damp is a colour. everything about the landscape is muted and misty and the chief reason that the thistle was selected as the national flower, adorning everything from military honours to football jerseys, was probably because it was the only thing that stood out on the bloody landscape.

however, bite haven't chosen to reproduce the colour of the... er... petals [?] of the thistle in their lipstick. instead, i'd say that the colour captures the beauteous spirit of scotland, infused with a bit of the purple thistle, but encircled with a rainbow of glorious damp. it's a neutral, but in no way the sort of fleshy tone that might be inferred by the term "neutral". indeed, if your flesh is the colour of this lipstick, i'd suggest seeking medical assistance. it's about halfway between the notoriously difficult to define shades of taupe and mauve, meaning that it has elements of earthy brown and cool purple, but tempered with a lot of grey.

thistle
thistle

one of the stories about how the thistle came to be scotland's national flower says that the norse king haakon [no detail as to which one] tried to invade scotland, but that his plans were foiled when one of his soldiers trod on a thistle and the sleeping scottish guards were alerted to the intruders. interestingly, as i've noted before in a post about my genealogical research, the scottish part of my ancestry was more than likely the invader in that scenario than the fortunate guard [and it would surprise no one to know that a relative of mine clumsily stepped on something]. thus it is appropriate that this lipstick, much though its connections with scottishness might seem a perfect match, is one that falls absolutely outside the range of colour i can comfortably wear.

thistle
"thistle" is a shade that's meant for people with sci/art true summer and soft summer complexions. my own bright season colouring isn't at all suited to its subdued, mysterious beauty. and, like a typical scot, i will say that i do na giv' a toss what anyone thinks, because this shade is such a wonderfully original, subtly thrilling colour that i'll wear it even with the stubbornness and pride that are my genetic heritage.

indeed, even among my unwieldy large lipstick collection, i could find very little that resembled this highland gem. mac's daring "viva glam rihanna 2" is darker, browner, more shimmery... basically, i just pulled this one because i thought it had a similar taupe quality, but they're not that close at all.

l to r :: thistle, mac viva glam rihanna 2 [l.e.]

so how poorly matched is it to my complexion? here's a look at it in use alongside and orange sweater that's also too muted and a deep teal eyeliner [urban decay 'invasion'] that should really be the property of autumn-season women only.




i don't care. this is a magnificent lipstick, that fulfills all of the high expectations that the formula has set for itself. it's a unique shade that, while it might not be what you'd call universal, can fit in a lot of situations without seeming garish or risky. i shall persist in wearing it and, if you're at all intrigued by the powers of oatcakes and damp, you should give it a try as well. if you are one of those lucky lasses, scot or not, who looks her best in cool, muted shades, those ones that everyone always seems to have trouble describing, you need to rush out to the moors of sephora and snag this flower for yourself. [it's a permanent addition to the line, though, so no need to shove, lass.]
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...